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shereadsbooks:

I will always be grateful for how this was depicted in the film.

(via mlboots)

Source: hernance
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theenergyissue:

Olafur Eliasson’s “Riverbed” Converts a Museum into a Natural Landscape

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations employing elemental materials like light, water, earth, and even atmosphere, transformed an entire wing of Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art into a riverbed for his first solo exhibition. The work, which uses rocks, soil, and running water to precisely emulate a natural landscape, stands in stark contrast to the white walls of one of Denmark’s most important Modernist buildings. Originally designed in 1958 by architects Jørgen Bo and Wilhlem Wohlert, the Louisiana’s staggered, irregularly sized portals create an experience that highlights movement through space. By filling the Louisiana with a landscape its galleries might have replaced, Eliasson heightens the haptic qualities of this experience and points to the reality of the museum as an institution and a physical locality. The work raises the question of how natural and built environments might intersect, though it is up to the viewer to decide whether this tension is constructive or destructive.

(via justmeandthetoaster)

Source: dezeen.com
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everythingscenic:

Eurydice. Melpomene Katakalos.

Mandell Weiss Forum, UCSD

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Source: everythingscenic
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justmeandthetoaster:

scenicdesign:

"Atmospheric"

With a strong basis in expressionism, atmospheric sets focus on elements that create a pervading tone, mood, romance, mystery or nostalgia.  There are numerous ways to do this, but atmospheric elements found in theater have included (but are not limited to) rain, snow, glitter, bubbles, confetti, streamers, fog, foam, haze and confetti. No matter what the set is “the space in which the story must unfold. The element employed may have a metaphorical effect, but also has to prove itself within the given bounds.”

Radical German scenic designer Katrin Brack has mastered atmospheric set design.  She describes her work as what “fits as a gesture, without shamming through decoration”. 

Her groundbreaking design for “Ivanov” was made entirely of “a fog controlled by a draught across the stage as a moving sculpture in “Ivanov”. As simple as it was total.” Characters entered thru a thick wall of fog at the back of the stage, disappearing and appearing out of thin air with little to no real “scenery” (we’ll work on a definition of scenery at another time). 

The production and her design looks stunning and audience members have told me it’s unlike anything we’ve seen here in the States.  But in Europe her design has sparked a debate on what scenic design is and on a more core level- what scenic design can be.  Some people say Katrin’s set isn’t set design.  Others say it’s crossed into a new phase of design, taping into something a standard piece of “scenery” (again we’ll define this later) can’t express. 

Can atmosphere be scenic design?  Comment below and let me know what you think and send me some of your favorite atmospheric sets.

"Ivanov" - Katrin Brack

"Moliere" - Katrin Brack

"Tartuffe" - Katrin Brack

Prinz Friedrich von Homburg" - Katrin Brack

"Das grosse Fressen" - Katrin Brack

Omg yes

(via woodrokiro)

Source: scenicdesign
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-stupid-:

*throws lamp at you* you need to lighten the fuck up

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Source: -stupid-
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deair:

so how do i relationship

(via steamingmugs)

Source: deair
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dajo42:

whenever somebody says like “so what did you do today?” just look off into the distance and say “the right thing”

(via fizzosaurus)

Source: dajo42
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thefrogman:

iguanamouth:

quick- to the

By Lauren [tumblr]

(via chaseross)

Source: iguanamouth